SEMINARS2018-09-17T10:45:48+00:00

Welcome to the Signal and Information Processing Seminar Series at Rutgers!

The SIP Seminar Series at Rutgers University–New Brunswick brings together a diverse group of researchers, both from within and outside Rutgers, on (approximately) a biweekly basis to discuss recent advances in signal and information processing. The term of “Signal and Information Processing” used within the SIP Seminars is rather broad in nature and subsumes signal processing, image processing, statistical inference, machine learning, computer vision, control theory, harmonic analysis, information theory, etc.

Seminar Mailing List: You can subscribe to the SIP Seminars mailing list by sending an email to ECE_SIP-request@email.rutgers.edu with SUBSCRIBE in the subject of the email.

Fall 2018 Seminar Schedule: The SIP Seminars in Fall 2018 will take place on the following dates (typically, Wednesdays) at 2 pm in Room 240 of the Electrical Engineering Building on Busch Campus of Rutgers University–New Brunswick: Sep. 26; Oct. 10, 24; Nov. 7, 21; and Dec. 5.

Fall 2018 SIP Seminars

Dr. David Karpuk

Title: Private Computation

Abstract: Private Information Retrieval (PIR) is the problem of downloading a file from a database without revealing to the database which file is being downloaded. This problem has been studied extensively from an information-theoretic perspective over the past few years, and schemes which achieve the optimal download rate are known for a variety of generalizations of the PIR problem. Private Computation (PC) is a generalization of the PIR problem in which a user wishes to compute an arbitrary function of the database, without revealing the identity of the function. Much less is known about this problem, especially when the function one wishes to compute is not linear. In this talk we will give a survey of the current state-of-the-art in PIR and construct some explicit PC schemes for computing polynomial functions. We will conclude by discussing some very recent progress on the problem of Private Search, in which a user wishes to search a database for a file close to their own file, while hiding the contents of their file.

Biography: David Karpuk received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2012. As a Postdoctoral Researcher at Aalto University, Finland from 2012-2017, his research focused on applying algebraic and number-theoretic tools to problems in coding theory and wireless communications. Since Fall 2017 he has been an Assistant Professor at Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia, and his current research interests involve privacy and security in distributed computation.

Zhixiong Yang

Title: TBD

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Dr. Alex Dytso

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Dr. Shirin Jalali

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